The need to sell used furniture attributes to many factors. Besides needing an extra stash of cash, the reason could be as simple as wanting to replace the old furniture, getting rid of the large pieces which are just sitting in the storage for a long time or moving to another place.

But of course, selling furniture that served us well is not as easy as selling lemonade. There are several guidelines to follow to become a savvy seller. Get the most out of it by following the tips below.

Calculate the Value

Stash or buried treasure status? Determining the value of furniture to sell is the critical part of the process. Of course, we don’t want to go overpricing the pieces just because they hold a sentimental value to us.

Typically, these types of furniture hold a great value depending on what period they got manufactured, the quality of craftsmanship and the identity of the manufacturer (was it made by a famous manufacturer).

It is recommended to consult pricing guides to an expert, library or free auction services online (especially if the furniture is antique or a valuable collection). Checking on newspapers, internet ads and visiting local consignment stores can also give you an idea of how much is the worth of your old furniture.

Furniture doesn’t need to be antique or a collector’s item to get a good appraisal value. Consider how much you’ve paid for it, who is the manufacturer, how long you’ve been using it and what is its present condition.

Lastly, put in mind that upholstered furniture is the most challenging to sell because most likely, you will have more takers for case goods (furniture made of hard materials).

The Price is Right

This one is a tough part, too. As much as you avoid over-pricing (the price is too high that no one wants to buy it), you also don’t want to undersell.

The point here is to be realistic when pricing old furniture. Again, you need to avoid involving sentimental value attachments and be reasonable with your prices. The memories that you have to a particular piece of furniture holds no added value to the buyer.

When pricing, take into accounts the scratches, stains, dents or tears just as how you take notes of mint-condition or well-maintained item. Prices should not be higher than the asking rate for the same items that you see displayed or advertised in used furniture stores. If possible, decide ahead of time on how firm you are going to be on your prices and if you are willing to bargain.

Sell Online

Because the choice of selling platform is online, include pictures and details in your advertisements to encourage serious buyers to contact you. Be fully prepared for meeting potential customers. If it is possible, move the furniture to an area wherein you don’t have to let the buyers go inside your house for example carports.

Selling different pieces like dining sets, sofa, and lounges and bedroom furniture which you can usually see on some reputable online shops like Focus on Furniture is always tricky, so having space where you can put them for actual display is very helpful.

Create an Appealing Advertisement

In selling furniture, it is important to build good ads which describe your furniture and generate a little excitement around it.

Add a bit of spice to the descriptions like mentioning some advantages of the furniture that might encourage a potential buyer. But a little reminder here, though. Avoid false advertising. Be honest with the actual condition of the furniture. Do not label a torn couch “practically new.” Again, include photographs (if possible taken in under lighting background), so that potential buyers can take a look on your furniture.

In some cases, online sellers do not only include the favorable list of the pieces that they are selling but also they include the adverse conditions. In doing this, it gives the potential buyers a chance to do personal appraisal based on the particular state of the furniture pieces.

Learn the Art of Negotiating

As always buyers will be more willing to bargain for the price of your furniture. The situation will be more likely to get the best price while the buyer wants the best deal.

If both of you are completely looking in different directions, there is that meeting point in which both of you find the value in a transaction.

Do not be afraid to make a counteroffer if the buyer’s offer is too low. Haggling is part of this process. It can get you the price you want, or you might find a greater value in finally being able to get rid of the item and sell it less than what you wanted.

Takeaway

Usually, in selling used furniture, no one way will be good for them all. You might need other methods apart from those mentioned above.  Concentrate first on the pieces with high value, then if you’re left with low-value items, it doesn’t hurt if you get to decide in donating them.