Some people think we can start an anger management program and teach our students how to lose their well-being, but I don’t justify the lessons. I think my students need to understand that this is because they came up sooner. Not only can students tell what anger is, but they must understand anger. If you simply tell your students what anger is and how to change it, there is no rosy treatment. The judge will explain to them and the world will be a safe place and the violence will be much less.

It takes about 4 weeks for the average person to shake their head. I think most of this happens until you stop being “angry.” It may take some time for the lesson program to be activated, or it may take about 4 weeks for the human brain to build up a way to understand “anger.” I am convinced that one of these concepts will be appropriate for almost all people in the treatment of anger at different stages of their life.

Depending on the size and success of the class, every 4 weeks, and probably every 5 weeks, there are classes that I can monitor with others. In the first four processes of anger (cunning, thought, primary emotion, and secondary emotion: “anger”), the student can see what works for others. Although students do not see the “thoughts” of others, most people may express their “primary emotions”. The student may begin to figure out why the man’s “Second Emotion: Anger” was so intense or controlling.

This practice is important because the anger student does not see himself as the “bad person” they are fighting. Other traditional practices focus on the student’s anger. The theory here is that over time, this practice is done for themselves and accelerated before they escape control. The aim is to capture the “thought” in the process of anger. When anger students use their frontal cortex to find others, I find that they develop methods that help them reflect on their own anger issues. We hope that over time, this process will happen when you have anger for a moment and before it goes out of control